CAER 2017 Begins... Thursday 4th May!

CAER 2017 Begins... Thursday 4th May!
What will be uncovered this year?
We're back for our 11th season during which examination of trench IV will be continued. Our work will examine the interior of the masonry building (the possible chapel) with its drain discharging into the ditch, the western part of the ditch feature where it is overlain by the medieval building and the underlying deposits. This year trench IV will also be extended to the south in order to locate and examine a stone structure identified during the excavation of a service trench in 2013.
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Saturday, 2 June 2012

Aye fond farewell...

Jonathan says farewell:

Last Day:

After being rained off site yesterday, we were all looking forward to a final day in the trench. Unfortunately we didn’t get to excavate anything new; instead we were just cleaning up the trench for the site photo and setting up for the Roman Festival that’s happening over the weekend. However with a water fight breaking out and wheelbarrow jousting the site was far from boring. After this we went for a drink at the pub to celebrate what has been a really fun 4 weeks enjoyed by everyone.

Dan W. offers up musings on his final day:

It was the last day of the dig and it had the perfect start. I began and eventually planned (in partnership with a beautiful lady) what remained of the hearth, its sandy underdeposits, with militaristic precision that left my lady-friend initially confused. But with practise makes perfect, she learnt with signs such as 'C2 four clicks east from west' and we drew what was I believe is one of the most detailed plans around. This took us, along with the levelling for heights, all morning  - but the detail, including the number of levels taken, made it an information rich data set.


Over lunch I copied a copy of my context sheet, context 603, to ensure I had sufficient material for my portfolio, scribbling way in much the same illegible handwriting that characterises my lecture notes. I argue that it was illegible because I was trying to ensure that after lunch I would have time to plan and take heights on the possible grave slab so it could be lifted before we left the site for the last time (except for the Roman open day of course).

Although rushed, it was done to a military standard with a well drilled work college who, after earlier plans, was now well versed in my vernacular.  It was all done in eager preparation for what would happen subsequently, but Uncle Simon had other ideas - it was going to be left till last. Instead of revealing what was underneath, we had to erect a gazebo for the weekend.

He may have been technically in charge, but Mike wasn’t exactly sure how to put the gazebo up for the weekend so he decided to leave it in the capable hands of myself and another.  With her guide experience and my obvious talents it was up in no time.

It was only after the gazebo was erected that I realised what had happened, our last task on site had been complete and I suddenly felt remorse. It wasn’t due to the fact that I had done a good job, but due to the fact I had had a great time with an excellent group of people and it now meant I had finished the year.  But I was determined to fix my sorrows and I decided that a drink at the Falcon would fix that.

It is thus with sorrow and joy, that we all headed to the pub. A great dig supervised by great people.

Tomorrow it is Roman Day in Grosvenor Parkand I will try and educate them that it is not all about Romans in Chester!

Dan lounges along with the 2012 Team.


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